Morphocode’s Urban Circulation Data

Posted by on Jul 14, 2014 in Apps, computational ecologies, data mapping | No Comments

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Hong Kong – Walking
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Hong Kong – Cycling
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Hong Kong – Running
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Hong Kong – Vehicular Transport
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Creators of the GH plugin Rabbit Morphocode have used Humanco Inc’s app Human to describe circulation patterns in 30 cities worldwide. The circulation is broken down by vehicle, giving interesting analysis about how people move through different metropolises. The imagery is remarkably beautiful and insightful… I would not have expected for Montreal to be #2 on this list for car traffic.

More here.

Edit: I incorrectly reported Human as having been created by Morphocode, it was created by Humanco Inc. Thanks @morphocode!

NO AD

Posted by on Jul 10, 2014 in Apps, Augmented Reality | No Comments

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I posted about Heavy and PublicAdCampaign collaboration Re+Public a few months ago, now they’ve released the beta for their app NO AD and are planning on launching an augmented reality art campaign in the NYC subways in September.

With the nascent AR hardware like Google Glass, Vuzix, and the recently acquired by Microsoft Osterhout becoming more prevalent, strategies for integration of the digital into the virtual will become more relevant and pervasive. Re+Public’s approach of replacing gaudy advertisement with curated art is a provocation at the moment, but what happens to advertising if you can program your Corning Automotive Windshield to replace every billboard with a Stephen Glassman Greenboard? It’s a little simplistic to expect a seven billon dollar industry to simply cave, but what would be the outdoor advertising’s response to their version of TiVo? How do you do product placement in the physical world?

Slight – Anonymous Social Networking

Posted by on Jul 9, 2014 in Apps | No Comments

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John Nash’s Slight is a geo-located, anonymous chat app that ties metadata to location instead of user identity. Rather than following a specific named source, the app allows users to find conversations relative to a specific place. Slight uses a map interface to show where conversations are occurring and allows users to interface with a specific dialogue.

Slight is an interesting development, a proto-web 3.0 app in the same vein of Foursquare. While the user is not completely tethered to their location, the app initially organizes conversations relative to location and conversations cannot be started except within a user’s specific location. This blend of inflexibility / flexibility towards geo-location is a compelling balance, and could serve as a model of how the virtual and digital realms interact moving forward.

Read more on Slight here and here.
From Michelle Lane / BREAD.